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[My activism Tumblr can be found over at thatfeministqueer]

If you want your ask replied to privately, just put '****' before you start typing.

My name is: Michelle, but most people call me Dark online.

My gender-pronouns are: They/them/their.

I am: 27 years old, a feminist, an atheist, an omnivore, and an ISFJ.

The Feminist: Intersectional, body positive, pro-choice, and sex positive.

My privileged identities include: Female assigned at birth (FAAB trans* privilege), white, able-bodied, allistic (?), and dyadic.

My non-privileged/oppressed identities include: Genderfluid, fat, Gray-A, neuroatypical, and queer.

I have: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Dermatophagia, Dermatillomania, and Dyscalculia.

I like: Pets & animals, animal welfare, pet care & pet care education, ~*SCIENCE!*~, anatomy & physiology, roleplaying, anime/manga, computer & video games, rock & metal music.

Hello.

 

fuckyeahfeminists:

rhrealitycheck:

stfuprolifers:

Should employers control your access to copay-free birth control?
If you think that employers shouldn’t be able to decide whether an employee has access to copay-free birth control—the time to speak out is NOW. The Department of Health and Human Services is accepting comments to the birth control benefit until April 8, 2013. Working together, we can make sure ideology doesn’t stand between people and their personal health decisions.

The window is closing soon! Share your POV now!

Crap today’s the last day! Go go go!

fuckyeahfeminists:

rhrealitycheck:

stfuprolifers:

Should employers control your access to copay-free birth control?

If you think that employers shouldn’t be able to decide whether an employee has access to copay-free birth control—the time to speak out is NOW. The Department of Health and Human Services is accepting comments to the birth control benefit until April 8, 2013. Working together, we can make sure ideology doesn’t stand between people and their personal health decisions.

The window is closing soon! Share your POV now!

Crap today’s the last day! Go go go!

Religion and Parenting.

invisiblelad:

sweetupndown9:

It blows my mind that people use eternal punishment as a way to make their children behave. I read on facebook this morning the sentence “I love that no one can punish better than our Lord!” talking about threatening her children with the idea that “Jesus watches you all the time” and that he’ll punish you if you misbehave.

I don’t have children so I might be out of my element here.

But the way I look at it is based out of how I felt being told as a child that Jesus was “always with me”.

My grandma told me that “Jesus lived in my heart”. and I screamed, and cried and begged her to get him out, because I was terrified of having a little tiny man living in my body. Of course the idea of that is ridiculous, but how scared I felt was very real. I couldn’t have been more than 4 years old when that happened, because my grandma was still living in Nashville, she moved away from the city when I was 5 years old. My family loves to tell that story as a joke whenever I am around.

Now, that was the nice sweet version of “Jesus is always with you”, and I was terrified. I cannot imagine how scary it must be for children to be threatened with eternal punishment. Not to mention the extreme amount of guilt that comes along with being told you are ~always being watched~ there are so many rules against everything. What if you do something wrong on accident? Which, as humans we tend to make mistakes. If Jesus is the ultimate punisher, won’t he be very strict?

Won’t that guilt and fear carry over into adulthood? (yes) Why should you be a good person because god is always watching? Why not be a good person because it’s the proper thing to do?

I’m no expert on parenting… but isn’t that just wrong? To scare your child like that?

I like to think that the way Lyzz and Chris parent Annabelle is a good starting point for “If you misbehave you will be punished.” Instead of teaching Belle that she is going to upset Jesus, they teach Belle that Mom and Dad will be very upset. That she has hurt Mom and Dad’s feelings. Belle will be legitimately upset if you tell her that she has hurt your feelings. She will cry and cry and cry like you spanked her (which they don’t have to do because she is sensitive enough to be upset at the idea of upsetting you.) She’ll even say “I’m sorry.” sometimes hug you. The point is that she is genuinely sorry. Not because she’ll burn for eternity but because she has hurt someone that she knows. Now of course sometimes the 3yr old “I don’t care attitude” comes along and that’s where harsher punishments are needed like taking something away, not doing something for her etc etc.

I’m just trying to process the idea that God is the ultimate punisher. Which I mean isn’t a new idea.. but the idea of applying that to your parenting… Blows my mind.

For “all the good” that religion does (which can be disputed. Another post for another time.) it sure does have to be very scary to be effective.

The “God is Love Incarnate…buuuut he’s also super jealous and wrathful and will destroy the population and punish your soul for all time if you happen to screw the pooch on this list of things” aspect of religiosity soured me on it pretty completely as a teenager. Sure, abstract looming punishments work as far as social control are concerned, sure your kid’s going to  be more likely to toe the line, but at the expense of some rational thought, autonomy and as you put it…childhood trauma.

(Source: kissing-whiskey)

stfuconservatives:

autumnyte:

Anonymous:

I don’t understand what’s wrong with supporting the Salvation Army?

Well, here’s the deal, anon. The Salvation Army is an evangelical Christian group, and they impose those beliefs on the people that they employ and the communities they serve. Here are a few examples:

They are so opposed to LGBT rights that they have lobbied multiple times for exemptions from Federal and Local anti-discrimination laws, and threatened to withdraw their services. 

They refused to provide shelter to a homeless gay couple, unless they broke up and renounced their homosexuality. 

They refused to provide a transgender woman with shelter that was congruent with her gender presentation, instead insisting she house with men. She chose instead to sleep on the sidewalk and died from the cold.  

Speaking of gender, there was also this charming incident where one of their hostels refused to open the door for a 17-year-old victim who had just been brutally raped (or even call the police for her) because that particular hostel had a strict “men only” policy.

Children who can’t prove their immigration status are turned away.

The organization also disposes of any Harry Potter or Twilight related donations (rather than giving them to other charities), because they claim the toys are “incompatible with the charity’s Christian beliefs”. 

During the Bush Administration (thanks to ‘faith-based initiatives’) they fired about 20 long-time employees (Jewish, Muslim, Hindu and Gay), simply for refusing to sign the organization’s statement of Christian belief.  

So, that—in a nutshell—is what’s wrong with it.

Winter is coming… and so are their buckets. Remember this when they’re bothering you for change.

lavenderlabia:

tonightmyheartsonamoose:

Re this

Yeah sorry but.

I was actually a muslim.

And white.

And I didn’t get any of the treatment you claim to have got.

So either you’re trying to make a political statement and lying or you live in a seriously shitty town.

Or maybe the reason you didn’t get treated badly is because even though you were Muslim, you were a white Muslim and thus protected from the racist component of Islamophobia (i.e. a large fucking part of it).

Or are you actually seriously suggesting that Muslim people don’t get treated horrendously in the Western world?

(Source: olentaalla)

1 - No/I don’t follow a religion. I identify as an atheist. It’s no secret that I’m not overly fond of organized religion but just the same I feel that protecting other people’s right to religious freedom is very important.

1 - No/I don’t follow a religion. I identify as an atheist. It’s no secret that I’m not overly fond of organized religion but just the same I feel that protecting other people’s right to religious freedom is very important.

The Neuroscience of Prayer

jtotheizzoe:


Disconnect, for a moment, from the argument of whether prayer is real. That’s for another time and another place. The fact remains that it is an ancient, powerful, and widely practiced behavior. What is it about the human brain that encourages so many to appeal to a higher power? And what is happening inside the brain when people pray?

When we look at prayer through the lens of neuroscience, we can make an interesting observation: Talking to God is not really different from talking to one’s friends and neighbors.

The brain’s evolution was a highly social process and involved complex problem solving. Yet, invisible entities are not a force of natural selection. Check out this fMRI study of religious folks, and you’ll see that religious people’s brains view prayer as communication with an actual physical entity.

Believer or not, it’s good conversation fodder for your next cocktail party. For sure, it appears that religion is far more than illusion for the religious.

eeeegads:

Just now, woman on the news being interviewed about being struck by lightning. Says she prayed not to be struck by lightning as she sat by the tree. Then was struck by lightning. Now she is thanking god that she was spared. She wasn’t spared! She was struck by lightning!!??!?!!

darziel:

The wording is a bit fucked, but this makes sense for an emergency form because some Jehovah’s Witnesses have certain beliefs related to medical treatment.


Truth. But still lol.

darziel:

The wording is a bit fucked, but this makes sense for an emergency form because some Jehovah’s Witnesses have certain beliefs related to medical treatment.

Truth. But still lol.

(Source: christiantheatheist)